Bike Maintenance....

Discussion in 'The Workshop' started by Dino Brown, May 16, 2008.

  1. F.A.D.

    F.A.D. POWERED BY MUSUBIS

    Joined:
    Oct 3, 2007
    Messages:
    2,587
    Likes Received:
    1
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Occupation:
    Feeds me
    Location:
    Alta Loma
    List

    I cannot say enough how much it bothers me to have PREVENTABLE mechanical breakdowns while on the trail. For me years of racing in the desert(rally), Road racing( formula Atlantic, F3, 125 shifterkarts) has taught me a valuable lesson. Preparation, preparation, preparation. Some people call me nuts for going through my equipment all of the time. I feel that in order for you to call yourself a true "enthusiast", you had better know your equipment inside and out. Spending 10 minutes before you leave your house to do a pre-trip inspection on your equipment can save you from a possible HIKE. I HATE HIKING!

    So here's my list before I leave the house.

    1. Check every nut and bolt with torque wrench.
    2. during the nut and bolt check, inspect all welds and corners of frame for possible cracks, frays, or anything unusual.
    3. move all components to it extremeties(cycle suspension, move handle bar back and forth, spin wheels, go through all gears).
    4. wipe down all components to make sure that there are no hidden flaws in any components.
    5. lube all moving parts(chain, shifter cables, pivots, fork stantions, etc.) check for any problematic areas carefully
    6. check air pressures (tires, forks, rear shock). if any is grossly out of spec, check for leaks.
    7. driveway brake check! make sure everything is up to par. gotta have good working brakes!!!!
    8. inspect hydration pack ( water, necessary tools(everything I need to fix or take off everything on bike), 2 spare tubes, co2, zip-ties, duct tape, tire boot, patch kit, hand pump(in case co2 fails), GU, my HT HAM radio(longer, remote rides), lights, first aid kit.

    9. load car - bike, helmet, gloves(half and full finger), riding glasses(clear and dark), shoes, and floor pump, and tool bag( contains all essential full size tools(not folding)).

    At this point I can feel pretty confident that I will have a good ride without mechanicals trail side!

    Always better to have and not need it then not have it and need it!!!! Then at least you get to enjoy the :beer: and not have to drown your sorrow in it:drunk:!!!!!!
     
  2. Pato

    Pato Stop stealing my thunder!

    Joined:
    Sep 24, 2007
    Messages:
    1,214
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Occupation:
    Computer/Networking nerd
    Location:
    Downey, CA
    Count me in. I've been suggesting this for as long as I can remember. Set it up and I'll be there. I've got the tools and a couple of workstands I can bring. We can get as in depth as you want. I'm not a professional mechanic, but I'm proficient with most areas of a bike.

    I've read countless threads lately about changing tires and breaking levers. I can show you guys my method which does not involve any levers. It's fast and safe. You'll never have to worry about pinching a tube or damaging the rim with the levers (more important for tubeless rims). I have not met a tire rim combo yet that cannot be removed/installed this way. Some do require a bit of elbow grease to remove though.

    If any of you guys are local to Downey, hit me up. You can always come over and I can help you with whatever you need fixed.

    Duc
     
  3. davidB

    davidB Active Member

    Joined:
    Jul 14, 2007
    Messages:
    4,563
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    36
    Location:
    Tustin
    For those that won't be able to make the eventual maintenance clinic, or need some visuals, check out your local REI. Once a month or so, usually on a saturday morning, they have a free maintenance/repair instructional class put on by their bike guys. They tend to go over the basics and cater it towards beginners.

    www.rei.com
     
  4. TrojanInsomniac

    TrojanInsomniac Active Member

    Joined:
    Sep 23, 2007
    Messages:
    1,182
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    36
    Occupation:
    DPT student
    Location:
    Madison, WI
    Count me in as well! After being out of the sport for several years, I do need a refresher on bike maintenance.

     
  5. Pato

    Pato Stop stealing my thunder!

    Joined:
    Sep 24, 2007
    Messages:
    1,214
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Occupation:
    Computer/Networking nerd
    Location:
    Downey, CA
    Oh yea, some forewarning here. I'm kinda like Cliff Clavin when answering questions or comments so it's up to you to decide the veracity of anything I say. ;) :lol:
     
  6. TrojanInsomniac

    TrojanInsomniac Active Member

    Joined:
    Sep 23, 2007
    Messages:
    1,182
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    36
    Occupation:
    DPT student
    Location:
    Madison, WI
    Pato - I really need some tips on installing/removing UST's. I have no problem with standard tires, UST's are a bi#ch! I end up losing layers of skin after doing so!
     
  7. Pato

    Pato Stop stealing my thunder!

    Joined:
    Sep 24, 2007
    Messages:
    1,214
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Occupation:
    Computer/Networking nerd
    Location:
    Downey, CA
    It's easier to show than to try and describe, but here goes.

    1. Get one side of the tire on the rim completely. This should be fairly easy right?

    2. Inflate the tube just enough to help it keep its shape and put the tube into the tire and rim. Tubeless people can skip this step, obviously.

    3. Stand over the wheel with the wheel at your feet and the bead that needs to be put on facing away from you. So if the wheel were to roll, it should roll to your left or right and not forward or backward.

    4. Starting opposite the valve start putting the tire onto the rim without rolling the wheel. The valve should always stay closest to the ground. Do this until the tire will stay on the rim without you having to hold it in place.

    5. Going back to the top of the rim (opposite the valve) place both thumbs next to each other, pointing away from you, and press the tire bead down into the center of the rim. This is the lowest point of the inside of the rim. Without removing pressure from the tire, slide your thumbs down both sides and work your way to the valve. This will hopefully keep the bead down in the center channel where the rim is at its narrowest section.

    6. Once you get close to the valve it may get too difficult to finish with you thumbs. If this is the case, carefully, without releasing pressure from the tire, flip the wheel around so that the valve is at the top and the tire bead to be installed is still facing away from you. Now use your fingers to roll the remainder of the tire on.

    7. Inflate your tire making sure the beads set correctly and reinstall the wheel on the bike.

    8. Grab a cold beer (or any other drink of choice) and take a good long swig. :beer:

    9. Enjoy the the fruits of your labor. :bang:

    10. Send cash/check to me for:

    a. Saving you the expense of not having to get tire levers.

    b. Saving you the trip to the LBS to get this done.

    c. Helping you to keep what's left of your sanity. ;)

    Note: No rims, tires, tire levers or tubes were harmed during the demonstration of this exercise.
     
  8. Rob

    Rob Active Member

    Joined:
    Jul 18, 2006
    Messages:
    2,511
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    36
    Occupation:
    Bike Mechanic at Rock n Road n MV
    Location:
    RSM
    Hey Dino, another good way to do it is to do all this after every ride, that way it's ready to go at all times, and the chainlube has had 24 hours to penetrate the links.
     
  9. Danimal

    Danimal Gary the Cat

    Joined:
    Feb 18, 2008
    Messages:
    1,440
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Location:
    Mission Viejo
    Doing this after the ride is still before the next ride.
    :)
     
  10. JOx2

    JOx2 Active Member

    Joined:
    Oct 16, 2007
    Messages:
    1,531
    Likes Received:
    1
    Trophy Points:
    38
    Location:
    Menifee
    i've seen him do this in 10 seconds.
     
  11. Pugz

    Pugz Fat guy in a little coat

    Joined:
    Jun 6, 2007
    Messages:
    1,153
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    36
    Occupation:
    Purchasing Manager
    Location:
    North Ridgeville, Ohio
    I have so many questions it's ridiculous. I try to do my own repairs, following the Zinn book. I have been shown some light things and learned some stuff but I wanna know how to take my entire bike apart and put it back together better than it was before.

    If a couple people are up for it I would love to have a little clinic after a Sunday loop sometime.
     
  12. davidB

    davidB Active Member

    Joined:
    Jul 14, 2007
    Messages:
    4,563
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    36
    Location:
    Tustin
    pugz, what crankset do you have? if someone could bring a bottom bracket wrench for your cranks we could totally do it in the park lot fairly quickly. that wrench and multitool and it could be down to a frame in matter of minutes.
     
  13. un-kola

    un-kola Just another Homer!

    Joined:
    Oct 12, 2007
    Messages:
    1,380
    Likes Received:
    34
    Trophy Points:
    48
    Occupation:
    Retired!
    Location:
    San Dimas,Ca.
    On #2 of your list,if you suspect a crack on the weld or any other location,look for paint flaking off or a irregular line.Put a drop of oil on that spot and it will soak into the cracked area and reveal the extent of the damage.
    Hey there Dave.Good riding with you the other day,and thanks for the pics.Did you get your bottom bracket dialed in?See you around soon :wave:.- Lloyd
     
  14. XCMike

    XCMike Doing the 29er thing

    Joined:
    Mar 10, 2008
    Messages:
    257
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Location:
    Whittier Ca
    Home Page:
    The biggest part of Bike Maintenance is having the right tools for the job............. yesterday I went over to Tom's (ubermensch) house for a quick crank set swap very easy to do if you got all the tools.
    I have fixed all kinds of problems out on the Trail for many riders like bent wheels, tires with sidewall cuts easy fix with a $1.00 dollar bill ;)
     
  15. EJ_92606

    EJ_92606 New Member

    Joined:
    Jul 26, 2007
    Messages:
    263
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Location:
    Irvine
    check torque on every nut and bolt before every ride? wow!

    Can you elaborate a little more on lubing the stanchions? What lube do you use, how do you apply, etc. Have never seen that recommended in the Fox user's guide. Thanks.
     
  16. jakethecake

    jakethecake New Member

    Joined:
    Jun 25, 2008
    Messages:
    616
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Occupation:
    Applications Specialist
    Location:
    Irvine
    I would definately attend a weekend clinic...always good to brush up on things.
     
  17. 2wheel_lee

    2wheel_lee Active Member

    Joined:
    Dec 7, 2006
    Messages:
    7,341
    Likes Received:
    1
    Trophy Points:
    36
    Location:
    North Orange County
  18. Jordansrealm

    Jordansrealm New Member

    Joined:
    Jun 1, 2006
    Messages:
    2,479
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Occupation:
    Photographer/Editor
    Location:
    Rancho Santa Margarita, CA
    Home Page:
    A few clinics would be great. A basic one showing how to change a tire/tube, clean and remove a chain, adjust cables/shifting, install pedals/bars/grips/seats, etc... Then a little more advanced one showing how to install a headset, fork, rear shock, suspension tuning, installing cranks/drivetrain, etc... Then although not alot left maybe a complete strip your bike down to the bare frame and reassemble class. I would attend all three. Some stuff I already know but you can always pick up new ways to do things. I still take photo lectures and courses every so often and pick up new ways of different techniques. Also, with how fast bike technology changes most books I have found written 10-20 years ago just arent current enough for me. I want to learn on bikes that are on LBS floors today, the bikes we all want and own.
     
  19. Scott V

    Scott V New Member

    Joined:
    Sep 20, 2007
    Messages:
    224
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Location:
    RSM
    I would be in for some sort of work shop. I am one of the guilty parties. I've been riding for a few years and ride quite a bit yet still don't know how to adjust cables, change brake pads etc. etc. I think the only reason I can fix a chain is becuase of sram's power link. I guess that's why my LBS knows me on a first name basis. I ride solo routes where I am miles from anywhere and out of cellphone range. I've often thought about the consequencs but I guess have gone by the thought that I have my bike checked regularly so I will be ok. Luckily no major problems yet. It would be good to save some money. I have no mechanical abilities and see myself getting pissed and doing more damage to the bike than actual good. I think that is why I have never messed with it.
     
  20. EJ_92606

    EJ_92606 New Member

    Joined:
    Jul 26, 2007
    Messages:
    263
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Location:
    Irvine
    Excellent link thanks.
     

Share This Page

Help keep STR alive, please click the donation button below